Poshmark Alert: Keep Your Account Secure

I generally try to keep my posts a couple of days apart, but something came up in the Poshmark community, and I felt it was worth posting.  Within the Poshmark FB community, we’ve been hearing of various new scams arising in the Poshmark network.  In the past, the most common scam consisted of buyers convincing sellers to trade, only to keep the items and never send anything in return.  Nowadays, it seems the complexity of the scams have increased, so sellers have to be even more careful about their app usage.

Disclaimer – I’m not an IT or security expert.  These are common things people have done to help keep their accounts safe. There is no one full proof way of preventing it, but we do what we can to help avoid it. However, I believe these actions may help in reducing risk of an issue within the app.

  • Use different passwords against your platforms – do not use the same password for your Poshmark Account, your email or anything else that is remotely connected to your Poshmark account (blog, Instagram, etc.). Don’t even use the same password format.
    • It goes without saying, but change your passwords frequently and make them different than what it was before.
  • Avoid Direct Deposit – I don’t feel comfortable placing my bank account info on the app. If you’re truly into the direct deposit thing, I’ve heard users open up a completely separate account just for online transactions. I still don’t feel comfortable with that, but I suppose it’s because I’ve had money stolen directly from my bank account in the past.
  • For buyers, if you have your credit card attached to the app, check your credit card transactions frequently. I believe this should be done regardless, but some people don’t. Sometimes, it’s just not a large purchase either that may catch your eye. Sometimes, scammers will make a tiny purchase similar to what others might overlook, like a small Starbucks purchase or a charge that looks similar to an Amazon purchase. If something looks off, question it and research.
  • This one is obvious, but do NOT engage with anyone that asks to conduct business outside of the app. A common one nowadays is people asking if the item is still for sale, and then asks for more information to be emailed at some Gmail address. Don’t engage. Block, report, and move on.
  • With the popularity of the 30mm growing, many people are following and welcoming newer users. When you get on a roll, you go on autopilot and begin to follow as many new people as you can on the “just joined” list. However, when you do that, you tend to overlook that some of these are scammer profiles. They’re really obvious too. They have a solid black user photo, and have random letters as the first and last names.  No need to follow these people – they aren’t going to add value. Block and move on.
  • Wait to ship your items – that’s right, don’t ship as soon as the purchase is made. Once a purchase is completed, send a quick note to the buyer thanking them for the purchase. Apparently, there is an increase of fraudulent activity going on in the app right now. The latest one being discussed in the Posh community is where a buyer indicates after a purchase that their account was hacked, and the purchase was made without their permission. Some Poshers have reported that the item had been delivered directly to the buyer.   With the latest security breach in February, that is definitely feasible.  As a result, if you ship immediately, and then later find out the purchase was fraudulent, it could take a bit before you see resolution since Poshmark has only been made aware of this recently.
    • Another common issue involves a scenario where buyer purchases, but somehow decides to cancel after you have shipped. At this point, you’ve shipped the goods, and you’re most likely not going to get it back.  Wait until the cancellation window expires and then ship. This is why I tend to ship next day, or if same day 5 hours of purchase.
  • If you run into an issue or fraudulent activity, consider that it might be best for Poshmark to get involved. For example, one user reported in an FB Posh group that her buyer received an item out of the blue. They never ordered it and thus wanted to return the item to the seller. In other words, the user accounts were stolen and were used for Posh purchases.  In this case, I’d apologize to the buyer and advise that you’ll contact Poshmark ASAP to get it resolved.  I generally assume the best and believe the poor buyer was in a compromised situation, but you really just don’t know.  Getting Poshmark involved may lead to a better chance in getting your item or payment.

So those are just a handful of security tidbits to think about. It’s a shame that people are out there to take advantage of what is otherwise a very friendly and social community. Unfortunately, that’s the world we live in.

Do you have any safety measures that you take for your Poshmark sales? Comment and share!

 

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